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Extending Practical (In Use) Shelf Life of Oncology Drug Vials Using Spikes

Author(s):  de Wilde Sofieke, Crul Mirjam, Breukels Oscar

Issue:  Mar/Apr 2023 - Volume 27, Number 2
View All Articles in Issue

Page(s):  154-159

Extending Practical (In Use) Shelf Life of Oncology Drug Vials Using Spikes Page 1
Extending Practical (In Use) Shelf Life of Oncology Drug Vials Using Spikes Page 2
Extending Practical (In Use) Shelf Life of Oncology Drug Vials Using Spikes Page 3
Extending Practical (In Use) Shelf Life of Oncology Drug Vials Using Spikes Page 4
Extending Practical (In Use) Shelf Life of Oncology Drug Vials Using Spikes Page 5
Extending Practical (In Use) Shelf Life of Oncology Drug Vials Using Spikes Page 6

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Abstract:  The global increase of use of oncology drugs combined with the higher costs of these drugs raise the question of how to reduce these costs. One way to reduce the costs is to reduce spillage by extending the beyond-use date by preserving remainders in the vial of (expensive) oncology drugs instead of wasting them. Therefore, we investigated if spikes, instead of the expensive closed-system transfer devices, can be used to extend the beyond-use date of drugs both at room temperature and in the refrigerator during seven days after reconstitution and partial fluid withdrawal of a vial. Six hundred vials containing concentrated tryptic soy broth were reconstituted with 10-mL of sodium chloride 0.9%, after which approximately 3 mL were removed from the vial and discarded using a regular spike for 300 vials and a MicroSpike for the other 300 vials. Subsequently, the vials were stored either at refrigerator temperature or at room temperature for seven days. After seven days, all six hundred vials were transported and incubated at a temperature of 30°C to 35°C for fourteen days. None of the six hundred vials used showed contamination, either punctured with a MicroSpike or with a regular spike, after storage of seven days at room temperature or in the refrigerator and two weeks of incubation. Conclusively, it can be stated that hospital pharmacies play an important role in keeping the high costs of oncology drugs as low as possible. This study shows that using a spike instead of a more expensive closed-system transfer device for preservation of the remainder of oncology drugs will further reduce spillage of expensive drugs resulting in lower healthcare costs.

Related Keywords: Sofieke de Wilde, PhD, PharmD, Mirjam Crul, PhD, PharmD, Oscar Breukels, PharmD, oncology drugs, cost reduction, beyond-use dates, drug vials, closed-system transfer devices, aseptic technique, worker protection, spikes, microbial contamination, microspikes, swan lock, sterility-preserving technique, cancer drugs

Related Categories: CANCER AND AIDS, PEER-REVIEWED, STERILE PREPARATIONS, TECHNOLOGY, HOSPITAL PHARMACY

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